What Happens If Britain Leaves The EU? | It May Be Simpler Than You Think

If Britain declares independence on 23rd June it will go back to being a normal independent self-governing nation state the way it was before January 1973 when (without a referendum) Edward Heath signed us up for the EEC. The Remain side seem determined to not grasp this so they constantly ask: ‘but how would Brexit work?’ For example on the 6th June, in the Telegraph, William Hague wrote a column entitled ‘The Leave campaign can’t keep dodging the biggest question‘  in which he wrote:

For voters to make an informed decision, this puts some responsibility on the Leave side to provide some details of that unknown alternative

The obvious problem with argument is that it makes the automatic assumption that the current arrangement is perfectly functional and that not changing anything is a viable option. Another problem with this argument is that it employs ‘straw man logical fallacy‘ – the remain side automatically pick the worst imaginable alternative to the current policy (or at least the one that’s easiest to argue against) they then presume that will be the post Brexit policy, and then start merrily arguing against that – as if debunking one hypothetical policy is the same thing as debunking the whole argument for independence.  Its a cunning strategy because it distracts us from the vast self-evident truth that independent nations tend to be more prosperous, progressive and better governed, and it flips the conversation into a paralysing discussion about obscure technicalities where we all lose the will to live.

This is not a referendum on the character of one unfashionable politician or the merits of a specific policy, this is a referendum about how our laws are made – should they be drawn up by people in London that we elect or by people in Brussels we don’t elect? Maybe an independent Britain will vote for more immigration, maybe it will vote for less, that won’t be down to Boris Johnson, Jeremy Corbyn or Nigel Farage, it will be down to what policies YOU decide to vote for. But I am happy to oblige Mr. Hague – after all, this side isn’t dodging anything. I will provide details of the ‘unknown alternative‘ by answering Jacqui Smith’s famous 8 questions on immigration.

1, Would there be a cap?
The policy would probably be quite similar to the policy we had in 1972, and if it were found that this arrangement wasn’t working then we would VOTE to fix it.

2, Would you retain any free movement?
The policy would probably be quite similar to the policy we had in 1972, and if it were found that this arrangement wasn’t working then we would VOTE to fix it.

3, Would you increase migration from outside Europe?
The policy would probably be quite similar to the policy we had in 1972, and if it were found that this arrangement wasn’t working then we would VOTE to fix it.

4, Would you have visas or work permits?
The policy would probably be quite similar to the policy we had in 1972, and if it were found that this arrangement wasn’t working then we would VOTE to fix it.

5, What would happen to British people living in EU countries?
The policy would probably be quite similar to the policy we had in 1972, and if it were found that this arrangement wasn’t working then we would VOTE to fix it.

6, What would happen to EU migrants already living in Britain?
The policy would probably be quite similar to the policy we had in 1972, and if it were found that this arrangement wasn’t working then we would VOTE to fix it.

7, What would happen to Calais?
The policy would probably be quite similar to the policy we had in 1972, and if it were found that this arrangement wasn’t working then we would VOTE to fix it.

8, What would happen to the Common Travel Area?
The policy would probably be quite similar to the policy we had in 1972, and if it were found that this arrangement wasn’t working then we would VOTE to fix it.

By Sebastian Handley

So as you can see, many policies could revert back to previous years before joining the EEC, and any that did not work, could then be voted on changing.

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